Flowering in Goodness

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From the Head of School

At the deepest level of our mission is the notion that if one is intrinsically motivated, not striving for external stature, for fame, for wealth, one would clearly understand the connection between one’s actions and all of life. One would understand there is nowhere else to be, but where one finds oneself now. One would naturally reveal one’s personal talents and thrive. Krishnamurti referred to this idea as “flowering in goodness.”  Here, in this place of completeness, we understand that it is in the ordinary moments that we find the extraordinary.

This idea reminds me of what William Martin writes in the “The Parents’ Tao Te Ching.”

 

“Do not ask your children to strive for extraordinary lives. Such striving may seem admirable, but it is the way of foolishness. Help them instead to find the wonder and the marvel of an ordinary life. Show them the joy of tasting tomatoes, apples and pears. Show them how to cry when pets and people die. Show them the infinite pleasure in the touch of a hand. And make the ordinary come alive for them. The extraordinary will take care of itself.”

 

Another excerpt states …

 

“If you always compare your children’s abilities to those of great athletes, entertainers, and celebrities, they will lose their own power. If you urge them to acquire and achieve, they will learn to cheat and steal to meet your expectations. Encourage you children’s deepest joys, not their superficial desires. Praise their patience, not their ambition. Do not value the distractions and diversions that masquerade as success. They will learn to hear their own voice instead of the noise of the crowd.”

 

You can find out more about William Martin’s book here.